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Thread: vegie or frier oil for fuel

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    26

    Default vegie or frier oil for fuel

    Hi all,

    I was wondering if anyone has run or is running vegie oil as a fuel in there trucks? I would like to start running it to cut costs on my fuel bills. But I have been a little scared to try it as I live in ontario and we get some colder temperatures.

    Has anybody noticed a change in fuel economy with it or performance and what happenes to it in the winter and is there a way around it gelling up?

    Thanks for your time

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Baja California Sur Mexico
    Posts
    2,804

    Default

    I have'nt seen the users of biodiesel posting for some time, try a "biodiesel" search on this site. Most were using modified veg oil, but someone was using it straight.
    Grant H.
    1995 6.5 turbo GMC K2500 extra cab 4x4 pickup, PMD under bumper, mechanical wastegate, 228,000 miles, rebuilt engine, 4.10 diff, 16 mpg
    1994 6.5 turbo GMC K2500 4x4 suburban "F" VIN #9 resistor, PMD in the bumper, mechanical waste gate, 226,000 miles, Positrac 3.73 diff, 17 mpg highway.
    1982 4x4 shortbed 6.2 Chev 260,000 miles untouched motor 17 MPG 4.27 diff. Best thing I ever owned, 21 years.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincoln, NE USA
    Posts
    712

    Default

    The best option is to convert it to biodiesel via methanol/lye de-esterfication with a water wash. You could then run it as B-100 or blend it with Dino diesel. Either way, you would have to use a biodiesel anti-gel with it, as the cloud point of biodiesel is higher than petroleum diesel. Unless you want the extra cost of a separate tank, heater system, and blending valves (like a Grease Car kit), making your own biodiesel is the route to go. You will see a 3-5% reduction in fuel mileage due to the lower BTU content of biodiesel/WVO vs. petroleum diesel, but the cheap fuel cost more than makes up for the slightly reduced mileage. The nice thing about the mechanically injected IDI 6.5's are that the fuel system doesn't know the difference and doesn't care, unlike the high pressure electronic injected DI systems like the Duramax, newer Powerstrokes or Cummins.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincoln, NE USA
    Posts
    712

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by grancito View Post
    I have'nt seen the users of biodiesel posting for some time, try a "biodiesel" search on this site. Most were using modified veg oil, but someone was using it straight.
    Christja was doing quite a bit of posting on making biodiesel about four-five years ago. There's a good place to start for posts.

  5. #5

    Default

    I agree with all of Husker's points. I've run NOCO Spec Biodiesel with zero problems, but I have not and would not run WVO or "grease." I'd stick with BioD, whether you make it or get it from the pump. I recommend changing your fuel filter after the first few tanks of BioD just in case it cleans out some of the dirty petro diesel byproducts from injectors, etc, which it may do. After that you should be fine. BioD is a lubricant AND a solvent. The lubricating properties are beneficial. I wouldn't run anything more than B20 if outside temps are below 32 degrees, and I'd add some anti-gel (or Kero) anyway at temps below 20 degrees. I live in the northeast and have had no problems.
    1998 2Dr Tahoe 6.5T, 4WD, 155K miles, SS Diesel Products: air intake, FSD Heat Sync Kit, #9 resistor, 4- inch exhaust, marine injectors, instaheat glow plugs, ECM 40HP Upgrade. Turbo-Master Boost Controller. 20 mpg highway.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    30

    Default WVO Burner

    Just saw this post!

    I've run WVO (waste vegetable oil) in an '88 6.2L crew cab and currently in my '94 6.5L crew cab with about 70,000 miles on WVO. It is very doable if it is done right! The Stanadyne pumps are famous for intolerance of less than perfect fuels. I have the opinion that thermal shock will seize the head and rotor assemly in the DB2 pumps and possibly affect the later (DS4?) electronic pumps. I think the key is having a system that will warm the diesel right before switch over to help the pump warm up to the properly heated WVO.

    I've done 4 round trips in my '94 and 4 in the '88, Alaska to Washington, on WVO and love not having to buy fuel in Canada
    '94 3500 crewcab, 284,000 miles
    70,000 on vegetable oil
    K&N filter
    Modified airbox

    S&S Diesel parts:
    Remote PMD
    4" exhaust
    Marine injectors
    Injection Pump
    #9 resistor

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